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  • Sunday, Oct 1 - Tuesday, Oct 31

    ➤ Adopt-A-Dog Month
    ➤ Adopt-a-Shelter Dog Month
    ➤ National Animal Safety and Protection Month
    ➤ National Pet Wellness Month
    ➤ National Pit Bull Awareness Month
    ➤ National Service Dog Month

  • Sunday, Oct 15 - Saturday, Oct 21

    ➤ National Veterinary Technician Week

  • Saturday, Oct 28 - Saturday, Oct 28

    ➤ National Pit Bull Awareness Day
    ➤ Plush Animal Lovers Day

  • Sunday, Oct 29 - Sunday, Oct 29

    ➤ National Cat Day

  • Wednesday, Nov 1 - Thursday, Nov 30

    ➤ Adopt a Senior Pet Month
    ➤ National Pet Awareness Month
    ➤ National Senior Pet Month
    ➤ Pet Cancer Awareness Month
    ➤ Pet Diabetes Month

Vetiquette!?

Vetiquette!?

What NOT To Do In Your Vet’s Waiting Room

Before even seeing your pet a vet has a challenge in their waiting room. That’s why The PG put together this list of what NOT to do in your veterinarian’s waiting room.

  • Don’t fail to contain your cats. Cat carriers are cheap and widely available. Use them.
  • Don’t give dogs free reign. If you can’t keep him controlled then it’s time to ask the receptionist if there’s a better place for your pet to wait. And don’t use retractable leashes! But if you must use one keep your pet perma-locked on the shortest setting.
  • Don’t bring in animals you cannot personally control. It may seem convenient to bring all of your pets in at once but that’s NOT what’s safest.
  • Don’t do the puppy park meet-and-greet thing. The vet’s is not the dog park. It’s a strange environment in which pets don’t always act the way you expect them to. After all, no matter how well you know your pet, can you honestly say you know someone else’s? And don’t pet other pets without asking first. Animals in pain may bite, and you can’t know if someone else’s pet is in pain. Give them space for your own safety.
  • Give the cell phone a rest. A pet deserves the comfort of your undivided attention for their safety and stress level.
  • Don’t fail to tell the receptionist ahead of time if your pet is severely anxious or aggressive. All hospitals appreciate the warning when you make your appointment. It gives us a chance to offer you back-door alternatives or other concessions to your pet’s unique behavior issues.
  • Don’t bring small children unless you can’t help it. A busy animal hospital is tough on small kids. They’re not old enough to benefit enough from the educational experience relative to their risk of getting hurt.

The staff at every clinic goes out of their way to treat each and every pet with care, attention and tenderness. Sharing that attitude with your fellow vet clients can go a long way to keeping you out of ‘vetiquette’ jail!

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